Conference Proceedings

Workshops

Friday, April 28 — Day 1 Workshop session 1–10:45 am–12:15 pm

A. How green is your grass? One consultant’s journey through physician compensation

David Peachey, Principal, Health Intelligence Inc., Halifax, Nova Scotia

 

Physician compensation models and comparators are an ongoing focus of debate in the profession and across provincial and territorial governments. Too frequently, arguments drift away from facts and take refuge in rhetoric. This workshop takes a deeper dive into the controversy, taking lessons from the past, raising questions about the art of the possible, and contemplating the future. Objectives • Overview of compensation issues • Constituent elements and their relevance • The backroom • Comparisons – can they be done and do they matter

• The ideal and other dreams • Where are we going to finish? see bio

B. Preventing burnout — proven personal and organizational strategies for physician leaders

Dike Drummond, MD, CEO, www.TheHappyMD.com, Burnout Prevention & Leadership Development for Physicians, Seattle, Washington

 

Improve your personal resilience by: Learning four leadership tools to increase trust, engagement, and performance of your teams • Learning three life balance tools for personal recharge • Building a less toxic workplace • Learning a proactive, system-wide organizational burnout prevention strategy see bio

C. The coach approach: change the conversation, change everything

Nancy Merrow, MD, Chief of Staff & VP Medical Affairs, Orillia Soldiers’  Memorial Hospital, Orillia, Ontario; and Cecile Andreas, MD, Family Physician & Graduate Executive Coach, Cranbrook, British Columbia

 

The coach approach is recognized as a specific set of competencies for leaders. Coaching for excellence in leadership performance involves the art of having conversations that provoke deep thought and reflection. The outcomes of effective coaching include new insights and connections that arise from your own values, beliefs, and priorities. When new perspectives are achieved by a process of skilled questioning by a grounded and focused coach, the person being coached experiences personal growth and satisfaction that becomes a new way of being effective.

Objectives  • Understand what is unique about a coaching conversation • Know when to use a coach approach in leading change • Practise authentic coaching skills to use immediately see bio Merrow  see bio Andreas

D. Beginners’ guide to the Indigenous health system — is jurisdiction really why we’re failing at patient-centred care?

Dr. Alika Lafontaine, MD, Collaborative Team Leader for the Indigenous Health Alliance and past-President of the Indigenous Physicians Association of Canada

 

Disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people continue to widen for nearly every measure of disease. Contemporary research suggests that the patient experience is also worsening for Indigenous people, citing factors such as hostile patient care and inadequate access to health services. This has serious implications for physician leaders including higher relative costs per patient, disjointed and redundant care, and poorer health outcomes.  As Indigenous patients become more empowered there will also be a greater risk of liability.  A new approach is needed to find solutions to these significant issues. Objectives • Discover the two separate and distinct health systems that Indigenous patients access, and their legislative, fiscal, and operational differences • Learn how these differences impact patients and sabotage your efforts at patient-centred care • Explore how an Indigenous-led, data-driven alignment process can be applied in your work environment and discover the building blocks for creating your own see bio

E. Ready, set, collaborate? Evidence from and experience of effective health care teams

Jennifer Verma, MSc, Senior Director, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, Ottawa, Ontario

Meghan Rossiter, Improvement Lead, Knowledge Translation and Policy, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

Lynn Edwards, Senior Director of Primary Health Care/Chronic Disease Management, Nova Scotia Health Authority

 

Health care is not a gladiator sport, with one health care provider battling a disease. A vision of high-quality health care only takes shape when physicians, nurses, and allied health professionals work together with patients and families as partners to design and deliver first-line care. Evidence shows that interprofessional teams improve access and continuity of care, while making more appropriate use of resources. But what are the features of a high-functioning, effective health care team? How do they articulate a shared vision? Define complementary roles and make decisions? Develop a positive and motivating team culture? Handle adversity? This workshop will highlight the experience of effective health care teams and provide strategies and resources for participants to apply — and make health care the team sport it’s meant to be.  Objectives • Learn about the difference effective teamwork makes to the patient/family, providers, and the health care system   • Understand key practices of effective teams: clarifying roles, practising good “meeting hygiene,” sharing problem-solving, promoting a team culture  • Discover resources that support motivating teams and creating and sustaining an effective team see bio

 

F. What does stewardship in the Canadian health care system mean?

Facilitator: Johny Van Aerde, MD

Panel: Carl Nohr, MD, Past-President, Alberta Medical Association; Intheran Pillay, MD, President, Saskatchewan Medical Association; Eric Cadesky, MD

 

Often used in the context of natural resources, “stewardship” has lately become a buzzword in Canadian health care. Poor feedback to users about the condition of resources leads to overuse, until the system collapses and the resources become unavailable to anyone (the “tragedy of the commons”). Thus, anyone benefitting from the health care system can affect its survival or collapse: physicians, other health care workers, government, the pharmaceutical industry, all of us.

 

This interactive workshop is for physician leaders and physicians interested in the changing social contract and how stewardship may influence it. The panel is made up of the leaders of the medical associations of the three western provinces, where the word “stewardship” has been used frequently over the last year and physicians’ efforts to collaborate with provincial governments around stewardship have used different approaches. Moderated by the editor-in-chief of the Canadian Journal of Physician Leadership, this interactive workshop will address following questions: • What does stewardship mean for the Canadian health care system? • How does the construct of stewardship affect the social contract?  • How can stewardship influence the “tragedy of the commons” and how? • How does stewardship affect the

doctor–patient relationship and professionalism? • What are the differences between provincial approaches to stewardship, and why are they different? • What are the commonalities?  • How does the concept of stewardship affect physician autonomy and independence? • How did the AMA, SMA, and Docs of BC work with government toward stewardship?  • Are some examples of action transferable to other provinces? see bio

G. Cultivating physician leadership: how, when, and where?

Colleen Grady, MBA, DBA, Assistant Professor, Family Medicine Research Manager, Centre for Studies in Primary Care, Department of Family Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario

 

Physician leaders are viewed as critical in the transformation of health care and in improving patient outcomes, and, yet, significant challenges limit their development. Organizations don’t view leadership development as a priority, medical training does not include leadership skills, and disagreement exists even within the sector about the value of physician leaders. However, a culture shift is taking place and physician leadership may no longer be the “elephant in the room.” Rather, it is to be welcomed, even celebrated. During this workshop, we will explore what is known about supporting physicians in the development of their leadership capacity and discuss some concrete practices that are taking place across the country, increasing investment in physicians as leaders.   Objectives • Learn what health care organizations are doing to support development of physician leaders • Contribute to current conversations about incorporating leadership development into medical education • Share, and learn from colleagues, how the culture may be shifting with respect to physicians as leaders • Take back ideas that can be used in your own organization to increase dialogue and create opportunities for physician leadership development and explore ways to enhance your own leadership growth see bio

 

H. Conflict management — practical skills to address conflict effectively

Scott Comber, PhD, Associate Professor, Rowe School of Business, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia

 

In this session you will learn strategies and practise ways to manage conflict among individuals effectively. Objectives • Identify and analyze sources of conflict • Distinguish among five conflict handling strategies and their application in conflict situations • Practise a conflict resolution framework to address conflict among individuals see bio

Workshops

Friday, April 28 — Day 1 Workshop session 2–1:30 pm–3:00 pm

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A. How green is your grass? One consultant’s journey through physician compensation

David Peachey, Principal, Health Intelligence Inc., Halifax, Nova Scotia

Repeat of morning session

B. Preventing burnout — proven personal and organizational strategies for physician leaders

Dike Drummond, MD, CEO, TheHappyMD.com, Burnout Prevention & Leadership Development for Physicians, Seattle, Washington

Repeat of morning session

C. The coach approach: change the conversation, change everything

Nancy Merrow, MD , Chief of Staff & VP Medical Affairs, Orillia Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital, Orillia, Ontario; and Cecile Andreas, MD, Family Physician & Graduate Executive Coach, Cranbrook, British Columbia

Repeat of morning session

D. Stewardship in negotiations in the current changing environment

Guruswamy Sridhar, MD, Consultant Physician specializing in Sleep Medicine, Regina, Saskatchewan

 

The health care environment and landscape are changing because of demographic shifts, information technology, public expectations, and significant fiscal challenges faced by governments. Physician leaders are in a challenging position as administrators and visionaries in balancing system pressures with professional and collegial relations with colleagues. This session will outline current political and economic issues affecting the health care system; physicians’ roles and impact; the role of negotiations — national and local perspectives; the role of provincial medical associations and ministries of health; and factors influencing outcomes. Objectives • Understand the interrelated issues in health care • Learn how these issues influence negotiations • Appreciate the factors affecting the outcome of negotiations see bio

E. Ready, set, collaborate? Evidence from and experience of effective health care teams

Jennifer Verma, MSc, Senior Director, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, Ottawa, Ontario, Meghan Rossiter, Improvement Lead, Knowledge Translation and Policy, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, Lynn Edwards, Senior Director of Primary Health Care/Chronic Disease Management, Nova Scotia Health Authority

Repeat of morning session

F. Connecting patients for better care: the role of the patient in the digital world

Asim Masood, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Canada Health Infoway  and Rashaad Bhyat, MD, Physician Leader, Canada Health Infoway, Anne Baldwin, Dr. Mike Fugurski

 

The digital age is upon us. Technology has changed every aspect of our lives — how we work, live, and play. Although the health system has been slower to adapt than other industries, it is just starting to experience what will likely be a fundamental shift in the role of the patient. Consumer engagement, for example, is the fastest growing sector of health IT investment. Why does this matter? Increasingly, evidence suggests that engaged, empowered patients have better health outcomes. Harnessing technology and engaging the patient as a true partner in their care may require changes to the way we practise — and it will certainly require leadership and action.  Objectives • Understand the attitudes, perceptions, and desires of Canadians and physicians with respect to digital health • Learn about various initiatives across Canada and internationally where patients are becoming increasingly engaged in their care and learn about what the future may look like • Explore the implications of digital health and patient engagement for the patient/provider relationship and what, if any, changes are required see bio

G.Cultivating physician leadership: how, when, and where?

Colleen Grady, MBA, DBA, Assistant Professor, Family Medicine Research Manager, Centre for Studies in Primary Care, Department of Family Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario

Repeat of morning session

H. Conflict management — practical skills to address conflict effectively

Scott Comber, PhD, Associate Professor, Rowe School of Business, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Repeat of morning session

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