Workshops session 1 Friday, May 29 — Day 1 10:45 am–12:15 pm

A. It’s time to thrive — what physician leaders need to know to lead a thriving team

Steve Foran, Founder, Gratitude at Work, Halifax, NS

 

In this session, we introduce and explore two foundational frameworks so that participants understand the surviving-to-thriving hierarchy and can identify the critical barrier that keeps far too many people stuck struggling to lead a thriving, happy, meaningful life. It’s not enough to simply know how it works; there needs to be a visceral emotional understanding. We will delve into gratitude and engage participants in a series of fun exercises that demonstrate how and why grateful leadership is critical to thriving health care workplaces. Participants will be provided follow-up resources to help ensure that the learning is long term.

 

Learning Objectives •Describe the challenges to maintaining a thriving mindset and the best leadership skill to overcome these challenges • Demonstrate four simple habits leading to greater personal happiness, thriving teams, and a more positive work environment • Explain why grateful leadership is foundational to critical thinking, workplace engagement, better ethical behaviour and a flourishing healthcare team

B. Finding balance within the new digital paradigm: how do our roles evolve as patient access to health information increases?

Rashaad Bhyat, MD, Physician Leader, Canada Health Infoway, Ottawa, ON; Cathy MacLean, MD, Director, Faculty Development, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK; Ewan Affleck, MD, Senior Medical Advisor, Health Informatics, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Alberta, Yellowknife, NT

 

Learning Objectives •Identify the links between physician burnout and digital technologies and participate in a discussion on possible solutions • Prepare and participate in a discussion with physician leaders about patient access to health information, and how we can adapt to this new paradigm in health care

C. Reviews: a guide for leaders and recipients 

Martin Wale, MD, Martin Wale Consulting Inc., Victoria, BC

 

Anecdotal evidence suggests that reviews — of situations, patient-safety events, or physicians — are becoming more common, but the capacity to do a good review is seriously limited in many health care settings. This leads to compromise of the conception of the review or its timing, or in the process itself being compromised, unfair, or incomplete. These processes are often confidential, sometimes highly so, and, thus, not well addressed in the literature.

 

Learning Objectives • Identify “diagnostic criteria” for whether a review is appropriate and how to design the best review for the circumstances • Create effective terms of reference • Experiment with conducting a review  • Outline how to survive being reviewed, including what to expect under an administratively fair process and where to get help and support

D. Introduction to design thinking: rapid, innovative, human-centred problem-solving that is transforming health care

Jodi Ploquin, MSc, Senior Consultant, Medical Staff Diversity, Wellness & Development, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB; Debrah Wirtzfeld, MD, Associate Chief Medical Officer, Physician Health, Diversity & Wellness, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB

 

Move beyond our traditional method of problem-solving in health care: committees and subcommittees that meet monthly to pontificate about what end users need and moving at sloth speed. Get a taste of design thinking, the problem-solving method that is transforming health care. Shift your mindset from problem to possibility. Learn how to apply human-centred and innovative practices to move from a problem to a solution prototype.

 

Learning Objectives • Define design thinking • Apply design thinking methods to health care • Compare design thinking and traditional quality improvement approaches • Apply human-centred practices to move from problem to solution

E. Seeing the problem you don’t see: the art of helping people change 

Jason Woo MD, Senior Consultant, Health Care Solutions, Arbinger Institute, Rockville, MD, USA

 

Why do we struggle with getting people to change? Because we don’t see the real problem! During this session, we will explore the underlying cause of most conflict in our organizations and how to uncover the ability to influence those we want to change. Participants will learn how their view of their challenges is distorted and how shifting their perception of others changes everything, unleashing better collaboration, communication, organizational results, and patient outcomes.

 

Learning Objectives • Understand why we don’t see what is really causing our conflicts • Understand how to shift to seeing others in a way that unleashes accountability, collaboration, and organizational performance • Identify how to internalize and operationalize this framework throughout your organization

F. How our conversations become our culture: physicians leading in complex times 

Darren Larsen, MD, Chief Medical Officer, OntarioMD Inc., Lecturer, Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

 

Great leaders influence more than they dictate. They remain open to new ideas and resist the status quo. They sometimes lead by doing, but often by questioning and listening, then allowing others to move ahead. They remain eternally optimistic even in the face of great pessimism. They support their peers and thereby support the health system. They rarely back away from adversity. Effective leadership in an environment of complexity and change requires tremendous adaptability and resilience. This workshop will explore the conversations that make this happen.

 

Learning Objectives • Understand why we don’t see what is really causing our conflicts • Understand how to shift to seeing others in a way that unleashes accountability, collaboration, and organizational performance • Identify how to internalize and operationalize this framework throughout your organization

G. Coaching and leadership: how to honour “cognitive capital” in others 

John Clarke, MEd, Training Associate, Thinking Collaborative; Margie Sills-Maerov, MBA, Education Program Officer, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, and Senior Director, Thought Architects, Calgary, AB

 

The LEADS framework highlights what we want in leaders, but the how is more challenging: the adaptive skills of leadership are invisible to most and rarely taught. As leaders, mentors, providers, and colleagues, physicians require not only the technical skills taught in medical school, but the adaptive skills of communication, engagement, and fostering others. Safe environments for these interactions are characterized by the ability of individuals to collectively grow, plan, reflect, solve problems, and create a deeper connection. That means that we, as leaders, must invest in the “cognitive capital” of our people to create adaptive and purposeful learning environments. Needed skills include how to get the best from others and intervene at the level of thinking, not behaviour. As health care leaders, how do we shift from our identity as “problem solvers” toward “mediators of thinking” to grow our teams and collaborative partnerships?

 

Learning Objectives • Identify the “invisible adaptive skills” as outlined in cognitive coaching • Develop and understand the power of a structured professional conversation • Apply interpersonal communication skills to develop trust and rapport

H. Better together: dyad leadership as a path to both personal and system transformation

Beth Vachon, Vice President Quality, Safety and Strategy, Saskatchewan Health Authority, Swift Current, SK; Susan Shaw, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Dyad Partner, Quality, Safety and Strategy, Saskatchewan Health Authority, Saskatoon, SK

 

The creation of the Saskatchewan Health Authority (SHA) in late 2017 introduced a medical governance structure that ensures physicians have active and meaningful leadership roles. Physician executives and vice presidents are partnered at the most senior level of the SHA, signaling a significant transformation of its organizational structure. Physician and administrative leaders are working together to establish an environment that fosters shared accountability, joint decision-making authority, and open, transparent communication. The SHA’s executive dyad leadership structure is one of its purposeful tactics in support of its strategic priority: “Establish physicians as leaders within the healthcare system”. This interactive workshop will explore the opportunities, challenges, and lessons learned through dyad leadership in a supportive and transformative environment.

 

Learning Objectives • Identify the individual, partner, and system factors contributing to successful dyad leadership • Analyze personal leadership experiences • Create a plan to test elements of dyad leadership within participants’ home environment

Workshops session 2 Friday, May 29 — Day 1 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TOP

A. It’s time to thrive — what physician leaders need to know to lead a thriving team

Steve Foran, Founder, Gratitude at Work, Halifax, NS

Repeat of morning session

B. Flourish! How to create a thriving culture under pressure

Dan Diamond, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor, Elson S. Floyd School of Medicine, Washington State University, Bremerton, WA, USA

 

When we are under pressure, our vision, hearing, and thinking naturally tend to become narrowed. In this workshop, you will learn how to use the power of framing and generative questions to refocus your teams to do great work when it matters most.

 

Learning Objectives • Contrast a “problem solver” and a “change maker” and list when to use each • Define convergent thinking, divergent thinking, and emergent thinking and when to strategically use each of them • List three examples, in your work, where you could use positive framing to improve ownership

C. Reviews: a guide for leaders and recipients

Martin Wale, MD, CCPE, Martin Wale Consulting Inc., Victoria, BC

Repeat of morning session

D. Introduction to design thinking: rapid, innovative, human-centred problem-solving that is transforming health care 

Jodi Ploquin, MSc, Senior Consultant, Medical Staff Diversity, Wellness & Development, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB; Debrah Wirtzfeld, MD, Associate Chief Medical Officer, Physician Health, Diversity & Wellness, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB  Repeat of morning session

E. Seeing the problem you don’t see: the art of helping people change

Jason Woo, MD, Senior Consultant, Health Care Solutions, Arbinger Institute, Rockville, MD, USA  Repeat of morning session

F. How our conversations become our culture: physicians leading in complex times 

Darren Larsen, MD, CCFP, MPLc, Chief Medical Officer, OntarioMD Inc., Lecturer, Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON Repeat of morning session

G. The self-deception trap: how mindset dramatically affects inclusion and engagement

John Clarke, MEd, Training Associate, Thinking Collaborative; Margie Sills-Maerov, BScOT, MBA, CHE, Education Program Officer, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, and Senior Director, Thought Architects, Calgary, AB Repeat of morning session

H. Better together: dyad leadership as a path to both personal and system transformation

Beth Vachon, Vice President Quality, Safety and Strategy, Saskatchewan Health Authority, Swift Current, SK; Susan Shaw, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Dyad Partner, Quality, Safety and Strategy, Saskatchewan Health Authority, Saskatoon, SK  Repeat of morning session

TOP

updated December 4,  2019