Workshop session 3 Saturday, May 30 — Day 2 11:15 am–12:45 pm

A. The psychology of persuasion and influence

Brian Golden, PhD, FCAHS, Vice-Dean, Rotman School of Management, Chaired Professor of Health Sector Strategy, University of Toronto and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON

 

Health care and system leaders need to know the right thing to do and how to gain the support of others. No matter how strong our analysis or how strong our convictions, without consensus we cannot embark on the types of initiatives that drive successful organizational and system change. The ability to ethically persuade and influence our clients, our colleagues, our managers, and our boards of directors is crucial. This session will guide you through a social psychological approach to persuasion, using tested principles that can improve the chances of getting key stakeholders on board.

 

Learning Objectives • Develop the ability to ethically persuade and influence • Build a validated tool kit (i.e., how-to instructions) for persuading and influencing others

B. Fulfilling our role in fostering a collegial work environment

Steven Bellemare, MD, Senior Physician Advisor, Practice Improvement, and Guylaine Lefebvre, MD, Director, Practice Improvement, Canadian Medical Protective Association, Ottawa, ON

 

It is widely accepted that workplace culture influences employee recruitment and retention. There is increasing evidence that this same culture defines the patient safety risks associated with a unit. In this workshop, we will explore how psychological safety can lead to more effective teams, decrease patient safety incidents, and reduce burnout. We will discuss the role of the leader in establishing a psychologically safe work environment where speaking up is encouraged and valued.

 

Learning Objectives • Define the role of the leader in establishing psychological safety • Identify practice changes that can improve workplace culture • Identify one leadership intervention that could improve “speaking up culture” in the workplace

C. Equity, diversity, and inclusion: The Actionable Knowledge Dissemination Initiative

Faisal Khosa, MD, MBA, FFRRCSI, FRCPC, DABR, Associate Professor, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

 

This interactive workshop will take the form of a “flipped classroom experience”. This workshop will provide attendees with the tools they need to pursue leadership appointments and advance their career. It will equip, enable, and empower attendees to successfully manoeuvre through real-life situations when faced with disparities.

 

Learning Objectives • Develop an understanding of the potential reasons for existing disparities in academic medicine • Define the requirements for appointment, promotion, and progress in academic medicine • Identify the tangible and intangible influences in academic promotions • Build a network of colleagues for ongoing collaboration and support

D. The power of presence and feedback — connecting communication to leadership effectiveness

Kim Kozachenko, CEO and Founder, KOLMETA People & Culture Partners Inc., Calgary, AB; Anurag Saxena, MD, Professor and Associate Dean, Postgraduate Medical Education, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

 

The health care system requires an exceptionally high degree of both professional and academic skills as well as agility in their situational application. Applied together, these skills can result in the positive advancement of self and our organizations. Our teams, our patients, and our colleagues all have the right to be led and influenced by great (not perfect) leaders, who understand the importance of strong relationships and achieving results and who believe in the continuous development of others and themselves. Participants will gain skills and tools that will enhance and stretch the foundational abilities required to be successful in leadership.

 

Learning Objectives • Identify the leadership ecosystem by connecting global concept of leadership to individual professional responsibilities • Improve and stretch self-awareness, presence, conversational ability, storytelling, creating compelling memorable messages, and delivering and receiving feedback • Develop the conversational and experiential tools necessary to be successful in building relationships, elevating their professional reputation, and supporting their patients, organizations, and colleagues

E. A healthy response to climate change

Courtney Howard, MD, Emergency Physician, and President, Canadian Association of the Environment, Yellowknife, NT

 

The World Health Organization calls climate change the greatest global health threat of our time, and the Lancet says that taking action on climate may represent our greatest health opportunity. Find out how Canadian MDs are already having a major impact on local and national climate policy by addressing climate change through the lens of health and lending their input as part of multidisciplinary teams. We will go through case studies from Montréal and elsewhere where MD contributions have helped to revamp the approach to active transport, take a look at successful efforts to minimize air pollution through a phase out of coal power, and explore initiatives looking at the health benefits of moving toward a “mostly plant” diet consistent with Canada’s Food Guide.

 

Learning Objectives • Describe the major benefits to both people and the planet of cycling; plant-rich, low-meat diets; and healthy energy production • Identify strategies and tools for physician leadership in planetary health  • Apply strategies of demonstrated effectiveness in planetary health advocacy to your home context

F. Compassionate leadership  

Mamta Gautam, MD, MBA, Psychiatrist, Physician Health Expert, Certified Coach, Ottawa, ON; Johny Van Aerde, MD, PhD, Executive Medical Director, Canadian Society of Physician Leaders, Ladysmith, BC

 

Burnout and engagement can be seen as opposite endpoints of shared dimensions. We will discuss how leaders influence physician engagement, how distrust, moral injury, and burnout inhibit physician engagement, and how leadership skills can improve psychological safety, trust and engagement in the health system, while reducing burnout. Caring compassionately for and with patients leads to better care, better outcomes, and improved well-being for both patient and provider. Through small group discussions, participants will have the opportunity to define the current state of physician wellness in the health care system, use appreciative inquiry to envision an ideal state, and draft concrete recommendations for physician leaders to support physician wellness.

 

Learning Objectives • Describe the current health and wellness of Canadian physicians • Explain the connection between attributes of leadership and the health and well-being of physicians • Identify key factors that influence physician engagement • Outline the attributes of compassionate leadership, and the four-step process of compassion • Construct concrete recommendations

G. Co-creating the future of urban and rural health care: pragmatic embracing of the partnership pentagram plus social accountability framework

Ray Markham, MD, Executive Medical, Rural Coordination Centre of BC; Alan Ruddiman, MD, Past President, Doctors of BC, and Co-Chair, Joint Standing Committee for Rural Issues, Vancouver, BC

 

The Partnership Pentagram is accepted as a model for setting up a social accountability framework for medical education. We have been working with this model and modifying it to apply to health system change. In the implementation of Primary Care Networks in Rural BC over the last year we used this model at community (micro), regional (meso), and health system/provincial (macro) levels.

 

In this workshop, we will apply the Partnership Pentagram and appreciative inquiry to create a common understanding. Breakout groups will model “who is playing in the rural sandbox” for their context and develop appreciative questions for the areas of focus.

 

Learning Objectives • Apply Partnership Pentagram Plus Framework using appreciative inquiry • Implement a model and approach as tools to meaningful support system change in a socially accountable way • Identify rural experience in health system equity

H. Mind, body, spirit — faculty wellness 

Mithu Sen, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine; Acting Vice Dean, Faculty Affairs; Assistant Dean, Faculty Equity & Wellness, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, ON

 

Wellness is the expected outcome of health care systems, but currently wellness is compromised, leading to negative outcomes, including burnout. At our school, we used a survey and focus groups to identify key gaps in faculty wellness. We then developed a “mind, body, spirit” framework on which to build concrete steps toward fostering wellness in individuals, the organization, and the system. This workshop will allow you to reflect on our program and identify opportunities and novel strategies for addressing wellness in your organization or workplace.

 

Learning Objectives •  Identify key areas of meaningful  “wellness” in your context • Outline strategies to incorporate and disseminate key aspects of wellness in that context • Review the development and implementation of a Canadian wellness framework • Empower and lead through  scholarship and dissemination of a wellness program  to influence local, national, and international communities

Workshop session 4 Saturday, May 30 — Day 2 2:00 pm–3:30 pm

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A. Transforming health care organizations: leading multilevel change

Brian Golden, PhD, FCAHS, Vice-Dean, Rotman School of Management, Chaired Professor of Health Sector Strategy, University of Toronto and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON

 

Reflecting on the facilitator’s research and experience leading change, you will develop a practical framework for leading change and consider its application to your own change issues. Attention will be paid to developing a vision for change, understanding the current state and conditions impeding or supporting change, motivating change, and sustaining success. We will examine stakeholder mapping, common sources of resistance to change (and how to address them), the power of networks and coalitions, and influence strategies.

 

Learning Objectives • Develop a practical framework (a how-to guide) for leading change • Examine the conditions impeding and supporting change • Build a validated tool kit (how-to instructions) for leading change in your organization

B. Fulfilling our role in fostering a collegial work environment

Steven Bellemare, MD, Senior Physician Advisor, Practice Improvement, and Guylaine Lefebvre, MD, Director, Practice Improvement, Canadian Medical Protective Association, Ottawa, ON Repeat of morning session

C. Equity, diversity, and inclusion: The Actionable Knowledge Dissemination Initiative

Faisal Khosa, MD, MBA, FFRRCSI, FRCPC, DABR, Associate Professor, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

Repeat of morning session

D. Leader developmental readiness and physician leadership 

Kim Kozachenko, CEO and Founder, KOLMETA People & Culture Partners Inc., Calgary, AB; Anurag Saxena, MD, Professor and Associate Dean, Postgraduate Medical Education, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

 

Leader developmental readiness (LDR) is “the ability and motivation to attend to, make meaning of, and appropriate new knowledge into one’s long-term memory structures”. We will explore the tenets and utility of LDR’s components: motivation, goal orientation, developmental efficacy and ability, self-awareness, leader complexity, and metacognitive ability. The workshop will include an alternating mix of brief didactic sessions and active and experiential learning. The session will end with personal reflection on using LDR to identify personal areas of development and high-potential leaders, and using the concepts in leadership development programs and coaching/mentoring.

 

Learning Objectives • Identify the leadership ecosystem by allowing participants to connect to the purpose of leadership in a meaningful way through the lens of LDR • Define challenges and opportunities for applying LDR • Formulate and apply effective individual and system-level strategies to enhance clinical and academic leadership

E. A healthy response to climate change

Courtney Howard, MD, Emergency Physician Yellowknife, and President, Canadian Association of the Environment, Yellowknife, NT

Repeat of morning session

F. Compassionate leadership  

Mamta Gautam, MD, MBA, Psychiatrist, Physician Health Expert, Certified Coach, Ottawa, ON; Johny Van Aerde, MD, PhD, Executive Medical Director, Canadian Society of Physician Leaders, Ladysmith, BC

Repeat of morning session

G. Co-creating the future of urban and rural health care: pragmatic embracing of the partnership pentagram plus social accountability framework

Ray Markham, MD, Executive Medical, Rural Coordination Centre of BC; Alan Ruddiman, MD, Past President, Doctors of BC, and Co-Chair, Joint Standing Committee for Rural Issues, Vancouver, BC Repeat of morning session

H. Mind, body, spirit — faculty wellness

Mithu Sen, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine; Acting Vice Dean, Faculty Affairs; Assistant Dean, Faculty Equity & Wellness, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University, London, ON Repeat of morning session

 

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updated December 4,  2019